Did I Break My Foot? Signs You Need to See a Doctor

Have you ever broken your foot? Chances are, you may have. According to WebMD, “about 1 out of every 10 broken bones occurs in the foot.” This may seem unrealistic, but not when you consider that “25 percent of all the bones in the human body are down in your feet,” according to Foot.com. Furthermore, “when these bones are out of alignment, so is the rest of your body.” Unfortunately, many people ignore problems with their feet because they don’t consider them important, but, as Foot.com points out, your feet are the foundation of your wellbeing. Read on to learn about the signs of a fracture and find out when you need to see a doctor like Austin podiatrist, Dr. Jeffery LaMour.

Broken Foot Basics

As WebMD describes, “the human foot has 26 bones.” If one or more of these fractures, you have a broken foot. You may think that a break would be obvious, but this is not always the case. Of course, you may have a dramatic crack in the bone, shifting part of it to the side and making the nature of your injury clear. However, it’s also possible to develop a thin, tiny fracture, subtle enough to ignore, but unwise not to treat, as it will most likely worsen as you continue to put pressure on your feet. WebMD labels these “stress fractures…small cracks can form in bones over a longer period of time from repeated stress on the bones.”

There are many potential reasons your foot may break. WebMD reports: “bones usually break when something happens to crush, bend, twist, or stretch” them. Kicking too hard, tripping, falling, or misaligning your feet could all be the culprits of a fracture. You can minimize your risks for a broken foot by avoiding strenuous exercise, wearing appropriate footwear, and seeing your podiatrist for regular checkups.

Sprains Explained

If you’ve ever injured your foot, you may have found yourself pondering: “is it a sprain or a fracture?” These can be difficult to distinguish from each other, and they often occur at the same time. So, what exactly is a sprain? The American Podiatric Medical Association explains that unlike a broken bone, “a foot or ankle sprain is a soft tissue injury. Most often, a sprain occurs when an injury pulls, stretches, or tears the ligaments that connect bone to bone.” If you sustain enough damage to your foot to break a bone, chances are, you’ve also injured your soft tissue, as well. Sprains share many symptoms with fractures (particularly discomfort and swelling), so it can be difficult to tell them apart. However, even if your injury is “just a sprain,” it’s crucial that you see your podiatrist for treatment to heal properly.

See Your Austin Podiatrist If…

When is it time to see your doctor? We recommend coming in for a consultation if:

  • You experience discomfort when walking, running, or putting weight on your foot. However, WebMD points out: “broken bones in the toes cause less pain, and you may be able to walk with a broken toe.”
  • You notice blue, purple, or red discoloration in one or more areas of your foot. Changes in blood flow can indicate damage to the bone.
  • Your foot appears larger. Inflammation is also a symptom of fractures.
  • You notice a loss of sensation in your foot, which may manifest as a cold feeling.
  • Your foot appears visually “misshapen, deformed, or pointing in the wrong direction.”
  • You have other severe injuries to your foot, such as “a large cut or wound near a possible broken bone.”

If you believe you’ve broken a bone in your foot, we are here to help you! We can assist you with any type of fracture. We will take x-rays of your foot to ascertain if it is, indeed, broken, and recommend an appropriate treatment to help you recover.

Did You Break Your Foot?

If you believe you may have broken your foot or suffer from any of the above symptoms, we encourage you to come in to our Austin podiatry practice. Contact us today to find our more and schedule your appointment.

Original Source: http://www.drjefflamour.com/sports-injuries/did-i-break-my-foot-signs-you-need-to-see-a-doctor/

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