5 Signs You Need to Change Your Running Shoes

If you’re a serious runner, then you know how important it is to have comfortable, safe running shoes. You should replace your running shoes about every 300 miles or so, but if your running shoes are not the greatest quality, or if you routinely run over rough surfaces like rocky trails, gravel roads, and other uneven surfaces, then your shoes may wear down more quickly than others. Knowing the signs that it’s time to replace your running shoes can help you take care of your feet.

1. Your Feet Hurt When You Run

Your feet or joints should not feel like they’ve been through a challenging exercise after a run. While it’s ok to feel worn down, tired or winded – you should not experience painful feet after a run. If you do, get new running shoes to see if this helps. If it doesn’t, speak with a podiatrist in Austin, TX.

2. Your Soles Are Worn Down

The soles of your shoes should not be terribly worn down. If they are, this is a sign that your shoes are not holding up well to the wear and tear of your running routine. Whether you’ve hit 300 miles in the shoes or not, it’s time to replace them.

3. You Don’t Know How Many Miles You’ve Run

Did you lose track of how many miles you’ve run in your current shoes? If you’ve had them a long time and you don’t know how long, then you may have already hit the 300-mile mark. Consider replacing your shoes just to ensure that your feet are well cared for.

If this isn’t the first time you’ve had a hard time keeping track of how many miles you’ve run in your shoes, put the date of purchase on the inside of your next pair. If you can estimate how many miles you usually run per week, then you should be able to track when you’ve run 300 miles in your shoes.

4. You Feel The Impact of Each Stride

If it feels like you’re hitting the ground hard with every stride you take, then it may be time for new shoes or custom orthotics. It may also be time for help with heel pain in Austin or Pflugerville TX. Call today to make an appointment.

Polydactylism – Should You Be Worried About Extra Toes?

Polydactyly is actually one of the most common malformations affecting as many as 1 in every 1,000 babies born today. The condition is most often related to genetics, but some research suggests that environmental factors could contribute to the development of extra fingers or toes during pregnancy. While extra toes may seem like no big deal, occasionally, these little extra limbs can cause problems. Here is a look at a few things that can come up when you have extra toes.

Problems Finding Properly Fitting Shoes

One of the biggest challenges people with extra toes have is the fact that it can be relatively difficult to find shoes that fit properly. Shoes are obviously designed for people with five toes. A six-toed foot can be substantially wider than the average foot, and the added toes can be in unusual spots, such as along the side of the big toe or seated slightly overlapping other toes.

Disruptions in Balance or Walking Form

In certain polydactyly cases, the added toe can cause a disruption in how an individual holds their balance or how they walk. For instance, an added toe that points in a more downward position may have the individual walking in an unusual way to avoid putting pressure on the toe. While having extra toes may sound like it would mean you have better balance, the opposite is often true. Many people with added toes have issues with an imbalanced stance, specifically, if the toe is in an odd place or one foot has an extra toe and the other does not.

Injury to the Extra Toe

Depending on where the added digit is located, it can be more prone to injury. For example, an individual with a nubbin (extra toe with little or no bone structure) on the side of their pinky toe can have issues with hitting the nubbin or catching it on things. Injuries to extra toes can be just as concerning as injuries to other toes. Infection is common with foot injuries and healing times can be a bit slower.

Talk to a Podiatrist in Austin, TX About Polydactyly Problems

If you have an extra toe or more on your foot as an adult, chances are your parents chose to not have the toe(s) removed when you were born. Reach out to us to discuss how we may be able to help with your extra toes and the problems they can cause. Contact the office of Dr. Jeffrey Lamour, DPM, PA to schedule an appointment.

From Childhood and Beyond: The Importance of Properly Fitting Shoes

A 2018 study found that 65 percent of children are walking around in ill-fitting shoes. When you consider that wearing shoes that are too small or too large can lead to serious health issues, some of which last a lifetime, this study’s findings are disturbing.

The Effects of Ill-Fitting Shoes

There are numerous factors that influence how a child’s foot develops. These factors include gender, age, physical activity level and the child’s body mass index (BMI). When a child wears a pair of shoes that fit properly, his or her feet are protected from sustaining injuries while walking across different ground textures (e.g., rocks, grass, concrete, etc.) as well as from temperature variances (e.g., hot pavement during the summer months, frozen ground during winter, etc.).

7 Health Issues Resulting from Wearing Ill-Fitting Shoes

  1. Ingrown Toenails

When a shoe is too tight, the pressure is placed on the corners of the toes. This pressure can cause the toenail to grow into the flesh, which causes inflammation and pain. Sometimes, the ingrown toenail needs to be addressed at the doctor’s office.

  1. Minor Foot Problems

Wearing shoes that are too small for a lengthy period of time can cause blisters to develop. In addition, sore spots, reddened skin and cuts are possible.

  1. Injuries from Frequent Falls

When shoes are too tight or too loose, the risk of tripping and falling increases. Therefore, the likelihood of the child sustaining some type of injury rises.

  1. Joint Pain or Arthritis

Shoes that fit incorrectly do not provide an adequate amount of support, this lack of support could increase the potential of the individual developing joint pain and/or arthritis later in life: The joints that are frequently affected include the knees, hips, feet and/or ankles.

  1. Foot Deformities

When a shoe is too tight, the shoe materials, which are neither bendable nor breathable, frequently rub against the foot. As time passes, bunions, calluses, hammertoes and corns may develop.

  1. Anxiety

Wearing painful, uncomfortable shoes while dealing with frequent trips and falls, can lead to an individual becoming anxious. This anxiousness and frequent falling could negatively affect the child’s self-esteem as well as his or her quality of life.

  1. Nerve damage

Consistently wearing tight-fitting shoes repeatedly places excess stress on the foot, which puts additional pressure on the nerves. Once nerve damage occurs in the feet, several different sensations result; These sensations include tingling, numbness, pain and muscle weakness in the foot/feet.

If you or your child is experiencing a foot problem, Dr. Jeffery LaMour can help. To schedule an appointment, contact the office today at 512-451-3668. Dr. LaMour’s Austin, Texas, office is located at 8015 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Suite 119.

The Importance of Good Shoes as a Diabetic

Diabetes is one of the most commonly diagnosed medical conditions in the United States, and it is no secret that the disease can bring along a lot of risks for your feet. One thing any good podiatrist will tell you about taking care of your feet as a diabetic is that the shoes you wear are extremely important. Here is a look at why good shoes are so important if you have been diagnosed with diabetes.

Good shoes will protect your feet from corns and calluses.

Corns and calluses occur because of pressure on certain points of the feet when you walk. While this can be the body’s way of offering more support or protection for pressure points, it can cause issues if you have diabetes. These growths do not get a lot of blood flow, and they can be damaging to the underlying healthy skin. Wearing shoes that evenly distributes your body weight on your feet will lessen issues with corn and callus development.

Good shoes will prevent stress on the rest of your body.

When you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you have to take extra care of the rest of your body, including the musculoskeletal system. Wearing ill-fitting shoes that do not provide the proper level of support doesn’t just stress the feet; it can also put undue stress on ankles, knees, hips, and even your spine.

Good shoes will protect your feet from direct injury.

People with diabetes can have problems with injuries and wounds healing much slower. If the foot sustains an injury due to poor shoe choices, it can leave you at risk of developing an infection in the wound that could put your feet and the rest of your body at risk. Well-made shoes without open toes or materials that are easy to puncture will help protect your feet from direct injury.

Find Out More About Protecting Your Feet as a Diabetic in Austin, TX

Individuals who have diabetes should have their feet examined by a doctor about once a year to ensure they are not developing worrisome issues. If you are diabetic and you have never had a proper foot health evaluation, reach out to us at the podiatry office of Dr. Jeffery LaMour, DPM, PA in Austin, TX to schedule an appointment.

 

Summer Flip-Flops: Foot Friend or Foot Foe?

The days are getting warmer in Austin, TX and those flip-flops are calling your name from the closet. With the ability to slip them on quickly, allow your feet to stay cool, and outfit your feet for just a few bucks, flip-flops definitely have their positive qualities. But are these good for your feet? Here’s what you need to know.

Cheap flip-flops don’t offer support for your feet.

One of the things people love about flip-flops is they’re cheap. You can easily invest in ten different pairs in different colors. However, flip-flops also don’t offer a lot of support for the shape of your foot. Most of the inexpensive versions are made out of a piece of foam rubber and a strap. The foam rubber doesn’t have any arch support, which can put a lot of stress on your feet, ankles, and legs when you walk.

Flip-flops leave your feet open to injury.

Flip-flops that are made from cheaper materials do not offer a lot of protection for your feet. Something as simple as a sharp rock could easily pierce the base of the sandal and cause a severe injury to your foot. Many visits to a podiatrist every year stem from injuries to the feet caused by wearing flip-flops. Even though flip-flops can be comfortable, they are not the best footwear when you are out and about.

Not all sandals are bad.

Even though the majority of flip-flops do not offer much in the way of support for your feet, there are some sandals that can be suitable for wear, so you don’t have to toss them all. Look for sandals that:

  • Offer some level of arch support for your feet
  • Have secure straps around your toes to prevent bending your toes to keep the shoe in place
  • Provide a dense enough sole to protect the bottom of your foot

Let Us Help You with Your Feet in Austin, TX

Protecting your feet is vital, even if it means letting go of ill-fitting and ill-protecting footwear. If you are having problems with your feet, reach out to us at the office of Dr. Jeffery LaMour, DPM, PA.

 

High Heels and Your Feet: What Every Woman Needs to Know

While it is true that high heels can make a woman’s legs look amazing, Mother Nature never intended a woman’s five toes to be wedged into the teeny-tiny front end of even the most fashionable pair of heels. Furthermore, once she has successfully wedged her toes into the front of this elegant shoe, the remainder of her foot is bent at a 45-degree angle (or more) and then shoved into its own very thin space. This puts additional pressure on her overly-crowded toes as well as on the ball of her foot. Women who wear heels regularly are probably doing one of the worst things they ever could to their poor, helpless feet.

The Unpleasant Results of High Heel Use

The use of high heels can cause a woman to develop bunions, callouses, corns and a condition that everyone dreads, hammertoe. While these are all unsightly and can cause pain, there are other very painful issues that frequently result from repeated high heal wear. These painful issues include shooting pains through the spine and the foot (i.e., pinched nerves), chronic tendonitis and stress fractures.
Ideally, Dr. Jeffery LaMour prefers that his patients switch to wearing shoes that are less harmful to their feet; however, he knows that this is not an option for some women. Therefore, he recommends that these women use the exercises below to try to counteract the negative effects of wearing high heels on a regular basis.

Exercises to Help Counteract Negative Effects of High Heel Use

The Intrinsic Muscle Stretch — Helps to Prevent Bunions, Hammer Toes, Stress Fractures, and Pinched Nerves

  1. Using the hand opposite of the foot you are stretching, place fingers 2 through 5 between your toes. Your thumb should be held outward. Hold this for 30 seconds. While holding this position, the muscles between the metatarsals (long bones) of your foot are being stretched.
  2. Now, push the toes downward. Hold this position for 5 seconds. This stretches the top of the foot, including the toes.

Repeat both parts of this exercise 10 times on each of the days that you wear high heels.

Stretching the Foot/Ankle Extensors — Helps Prevent Stress Fractures of the Shin Bones and Feet

While in the kneeling position, take a rolled-up hand towel and place it under your feet. The towel should be placed just beneath the area where your toes and the rest of your foot meet. Gently place your hips on your heels, almost as if you are sitting. You should only place enough pressure on your heels to feel a pulling sensation across the top of your ankles and feet. You may also notice a stretching sensation up the front of your shins. Hold this position for 30 seconds.

Repeat this stretch twice on each of the days that you wear high heels.

What Should You Look for in a Running Shoe?

Did you know you should retire your running shoes once you’ve run 300-500 miles in them? For runners that average 10 miles per week, that’s a new pair of shoes at least once a year.

Your feet are complicated structures of bone, muscle, and connective tissue that work together to carry you to the finish line. Choosing the right running shoes for your feet is more than just picking out your favorite brand. The wrong pair of shoes can cause blisters, discomfort, and even an injury that keeps you from your runs.

When you buy new running shoes, you should look for a pair that matches your running style and supports your feet properly. Trying on the shoes before you buy and testing them by walking or running briefly is a must.

The choices in running shoes seem endless, and it can be hard to know where to start. That’s where we can help. Our podiatrist, Dr. Jeffery LaMour, regularly helps runners learn more about their feet and find the best running shoes to keep them active. Choosing the right running shoes often involves studying your running habits and examining your biomechanics to find the perfect fit.

Consider your running habits

Do you run a few miles every week or do you regularly run marathons? Your running habits and where you run play a role in your shoe selection.

If you’re training for a marathon, you’ll probably log more miles on your shoes than if you run for exercise alone. Running more means that your shoes will wear out faster. Replacing them in a timely fashion is key because running in worn-out shoes makes you more prone to injury.

Where you run influences your shoe choice, too. Hard surfaces like sidewalks and streets can be higher impact than running on trails or grass or a treadmill.

Running shoes for the road typically have softer midsoles and extra cushioning to absorb shock from solid surfaces like concrete and asphalt. Shoes for running on trails often have thicker soles to protect your feet from sharp rocks as well as thicker treads to keep you from slipping on rocks or mud.

Get your feet and gait measured

Your gait refers to the way you naturally walk and run. We can assess your gait and make recommendations to keep your feet comfortable as you run. A professional evaluation of your feet can make a big difference when you’re looking for the right running shoes. Some gait abnormalities, like overpronation or underpronation, can be corrected by the right running shoes.

Whenever you buy new shoes, you should have your feet measured to make sure you’re getting the right size shoe. Your feet change over time, and shoe manufacturers update their designs regularly, so the exact style of shoe that you bought last year might not fit the same way this year.

When you come for a shoe fitting, bring your old running shoes. Wear patterns on your used shoes will show us how your feet move as you run and help us determine if you might benefit from shoe inserts.

Once you find the right pair of running shoes, it’s a good idea to break them in slowly. Changing shoes can change your gait, and your new shoes might have more support than you’re used to. Take your new shoes out for a few short runs to let your feet get used to them before you go on a longer run.

Still, have questions about choosing a pair of running shoes? Come in to see Dr. LaMour for professional help. He’ll evaluate your feet to help you learn about the type of support you need in shoes, and make personalized recommendations just for you. Call one of our offices in Austin or Pflugerville, Texas, or request your first appointment online today to get started.

10 Shoe Shopping Tips for Happy Feet

Your feet serve you well, carrying you where you need to go, all while bearing the entire weight of your body. It’s a tall order and these relatively small body parts are usually up to the task. If you hinder their function in any way, however, you run the risk of creating painful foot and ankle problems.

The better option is to provide critical support for your beleaguered feet in the form of good footwear that’s an asset rather than a liability. At Family Foot & Ankle, we aim to help our patients in Pflugerville and Austin, Texas, take the best care of their feet and that means choosing the right shoes.

Here are 10 shoe shopping tips that will keep your feet happily skipping along.

1. Take it down a notch

If you’re a woman, you probably guessed that we need to address the elephant, or the heel, in the room. High heels are bad for your feet and ankles, and there’s no getting around that. Since we know that fashion wins out more often than it should, we advise you to choose your heels wisely. Opt for heels that have a wedge shape to them and a raised platform at the toe. Wedges are far more sturdy than stilettos, and the platform at the toe gives you the height you want without the added pressure on the balls of your feet.

2. Size matters

It may seem obvious, but when you go shoe shopping, make sure the shoe is the proper size for your feet. While you may have been a 6 a few years ago, you could now be a 7 (not to mention different manufacturers may size shoes differently). Better yet, go to a shoe store that still measures your feet to be sure. And be sure to measure both feet, since one may be slightly larger than the other.

3. A little breathing room

While those pointy shoes may add just the look you want, they’re incredibly bad for your feet. These shoes can lead to metatarsalgia (pain in the ball of your foot), hammertoes, and neuroma, a painful nerve inflammation between your toes. Opt instead for a shoe with a wider toe box, allowing your toes to spread out and do their job. In fact, the rule of thumb is that you should have at least a ¼-inch space between the end of your toes and the shoe.

4. Leave flip flops for the beach

Flip flops are easy to throw on and run around in, but these shoes provide little in the way of arch support, and they’re highly unstable. We see many ankle injuries in people who wear flip flops at inappropriate times.

5. The right tool for the job

It’s important that you chose the right footwear for the activity you’re engaged in. Hiking out on a trail in treadless street shoes can be a recipe for disaster. Make sure that your shoes match your activities in terms of tread, support, purpose, and coverage.

6. Try it out

When you go shopping, walk around in the shoe as much as you can. Designer warehouses provide ample room with carpeted floors, but you’ll have more difficulty in a smaller shop. Still, the more you wear the shoe, the more you can determine how well it fits. You’d be surprised to find how many shoes start to pinch or hurt when you take them for a real spin.

7. Timing and preparation matter

If it’s the middle of the summer, and you’re shopping for hiking boots while wearing sandals, plan ahead and bring along the socks you would use for the shoe you’re shopping for. As well, avoid shoe shopping first thing in the morning. As you go about your day, your feet expand, so try and do your shopping in the afternoon.

8. Attention to detail

While the shoe you want may look great on the outside, it’s the inside that matters when it comes to your feet. Check and make sure that there aren’t any seams or hardware that might irritate your feet.

9. Be sensible

It used to be that sensible shoes were ugly shoes. That’s no longer the case, as shoe manufacturers are answering the call for fashionable and comfortable shoes. So, even though it’s a brand your mother wore, take another look — you might be pleasantly surprised.

10. Get help

To maximize just about any shoe, custom orthotics can make good shoes even better by providing support where you need it most, from your arches to your ankle. At Family Foot & Ankle, we offer thin custom orthotics that are crafted to fit your feet in most any shoe you want to wear. With custom orthotics, your shoe options may even get broader.

To learn more about finding the right shoes for your feet, feel free to call us at Family Foot & Ankle, or book an appointment online.

How to Wear Shoes When Your Feet Are Sunburned

We hope you had a wonderful Memorial Day yesterday! Summer will be here before you know it, and with the weather heating up, holidays are a great time to go swimming, sunbathing, and picnicking. As fun as it is, flip-flopping around in sandals or going barefoot through the grass can put your feet at risk for sunburn. Dealing with burnt, blistered, red skin is no fun anywhere on your body, but it can be particularly tough on your feet, since you’ll probably have to put on shoes and walk around even while they’re still healing. At our Austin podiatry practice, Dr. Jeffery LaMour and our team are here to help you with every facet of your foot health, including sunburns. We provide practical advice to assist with your podiatric health through every season and holiday. In the following blog, we’ll cover how to wear shoes when your feet are sunburned and give our tips for healing that frustrating condition.

Shoe Suggestions

Chances are, you won’t be able to drive your kids to school, go grocery shopping, or waltz into the office barefoot. It can be difficult or even seem downright impossible to strap on shoes over your burnt skin. To get through this tough stage of healing, we recommend:

  • Wearing flip-flops or other open shoes such as sandals, if appropriate. The less pressure you can put on your skin and the more you can leave it open to the air, the better. Steer clear of tight straps or textured materials that could rub against the burn.
  • Wearing loose socks and relatively roomy shoes, if you must wear close-toed footwear. Ideally, you can strike a balance between shoes that are too tight, which will pinch the burn, and those that are so big that your feet slide around in them, which could create much-unwanted friction for your sensitive feet.
  • Test out your shoes before you leave the house. While you might want to remain barefoot for as long as possible with a burn, it’s a good idea to try out your footwear for five to ten minutes before you head out. This gives you time to realize that the straps on those sandals are actually too tight, or switch out those textured socks for a smoother pair.

In addition to the above, you may want to take a low dose of an anti-inflammatory medication while you’re out and about to diminish discomfort and swelling. Also, see if you can minimize your time in shoes during the first few days after your sunburn. You should also avoid sun exposure as much as possible (so, if you need to work or run errands outside, you might want to go for close-toed options). This will give your feet the opportunity to heal faster.

Treating the Sunburn

Following the right steps at home can also make wearing shoes out more bearable, even with a bad burn. WebMD suggests: “apply cold compresses to your skin or take a cool bath to soothe the burn.” You can also utilize special “creams or gels” such as those with “menthol, camphor, or aloe.” These ingredients can help relieve discomfort and moisturize the area. For even greater relief, WebMD suggests: “refrigerating the cream first” so it’s nice and cool. You can also help treat your sunburn from the inside out by “drink[ing] plenty of water and other fluids so that you don’t become dehydrated.” Prevention also advises avoiding soap or using only a mild brand, since it “can dry and irritate skin with a sunburn” and instructs sunburned patients to “gently pat your skin dry with a clean towel” after wetting them, since rubbing the skin too vigorously with a towel can “irritate it further.”

Podiatric Prevention

Of course, we’d all rather just not get sunburns on our feet in the first place. In addition to avoiding the discomfort of a burn, a proactive approach can help you avoid more serious health risks. Care2 reported: “Members of the New York State Podiatric Medical Association (NYSPMA) were recently polled to find out if they’d ever found melanoma or skin cancer during a routine foot examination. Seventy-five percent said they had.” To save your feet and, potentially, your life, we recommend that you always remember to put sunscreen of at least 30 SPF on your feet, reapply it every two hours, and avoid excess sun exposure. We also recommend you see Dr. LaMour at least annually for podiatric examinations. During these appointments, he will check your feet for any abnormalities and provide further foot care advice.

Are Your Feet Sunburned?

Did your feet have a little too much fun in the sun this Memorial Day? Do you want more recommendations for handling sunburned feet and other summer foot care tipsContact our Austin podiatry practice today to find out more and schedule an appointment with Dr. LaMour.

Original Source: https://www.drjefflamour.com/foot-care/how-to-wear-shoes-when-your-feet-are-sunburned/

The Best Types of Shoes for Flat Feet

According to the Institute for Preventive Foot Health, “8 percent of U.S. adults ages 21 and older (about 18 million people)” suffer from flat feet. This problem may be prevalent, but that doesn’t make it healthy. Your arch is the baseline for your podiatric well-being and the foundation of your general health. However, you might not even realize you have this condition or have a clue how to handle it. At our Austin podiatry practice, Dr. Jeffery LaMour and his team often assist patients with flat feet. While severe cases may require more intensive treatment or even surgery, flat feet can typically be managed with lifestyle modifications. One of the most important factors to consider in handling flat feet is your footwear. Your shoes could make or break your arch health. In the following blog, we go over the basics of flat feet and provide our recommendations for the best shoes if you suffer from this condition.

Flat Feet Fundamentals

Many people suffer from flat feet without knowing it. The Institute for Preventive Foot Health offers this definition: “Flat feet (pes planus) is a fairly common condition in which the foot does not have a normal arch, and so the entire foot touches the floor when you’re standing.” WebMD explains further, “Tendons—tight bands that attach at the heel and foot bones—form the arch…when the tendons do not pull together properly, there is little to no arch. This is called flat foot or fallen arch.” Basically, the inner middle portion of your feet should be slightly raised to properly support your body weight and maintain a healthy foot structure. If it has collapsed, you suffer from flat feet.

There are a variety of factors that can lead to flat feet, including genetic conditions, tendon damage, foot fractures, aging, obesity, arthritis, and many others. If you suffer from flat feet, WebMD explains, your feet might

  • become tired easily
  • be “painful or achy, especially in the areas of the arches and heels”
  • swell at the heel
  • cause leg and back discomfort
  • strain or be unable to move in certain ways, such as “standing on your toes.”

If you have experienced any of the above, we recommend that you Dr. LaMour for a complete diagnosis and customized treatment plan.

Footwear Characteristics to Consider

If you have flat feet, what kinds of shoes should you be wearing? In her Livestrong article on this topic, Deborah Dunham highlights three features your footwear should have if you’re flat-footed:

1.    Support. She advises against “shoes without any support such as flip-flops, sandals, or high heels,” since “these do not give the arch any lift.” At a minimum, she recommends purchasing footwear with “added support” which simply means the shoes “are technically designed to do what a normal arch is supposed to do.”

2.    Stability. Dunham describes, “People with flat feet tend to pronate, or turn their ankle inward when they walk or run.” Stability shoes are specially designed to control the angle of the foot within the shoe and “correct this pronation.”

3.    Motion Control. Particularly for those with flatter feet, Dunham suggests, “motion control shoes…a step above stability shoes with additional support and control to keep the ankle straight when moving forward.” These shoes are jam-packed with extra material to support your feet and lift your arches up as you exercise.

Keeping these three points in mind should help you make better choices when you pick out your next pair of shoes.

Our Recommendations

If you have flat feet, it might feel like there simply aren’t any good shoes for you, but that isn’t true! Dr. LaMour and our team can assist you in finding great footwear that suits your needs and boosts your podiatric health. For example, FootSmart has a wide selection and allows you to sort by ailment, so you can look for shoes designed specifically for flat feet. Riley Jones’ Complex article suggests the “10 best sneakers for runners with flat feet.” For an elegant, pretty look, Barking Dog Shoes spotlights five different styles of gorgeous flats for women with flat feet, including a pair from Taryn Rose footwear, which was “founded by an orthopedic surgeon…designed with room for the toes to wiggle, substantial arch support, and a layer of PORON® Performance Cushioning which is breathable and won’t break down with wear.” If you know what to look for, your options are virtually limitless!

How We Can Help

In addition to diagnosing your condition and helping you find appropriate footwear, Dr. LaMour can custom fit you for orthotics. These inserts can support your arches, enhancing your existing shoes or adding an extra layer of protection to already-supportive footwear.

Do You Have Flat Feet?

Dr. LaMour and our team can help you enjoy healthier, more comfortable feet. Contact our Austin podiatry practice today to learn more and schedule your appointment!

Original Source: https://www.drjefflamour.com/foot-diseases/the-best-types-of-shoes-for-flat-feet/