How to Deal with Calluses as a Diabetic

With diabetes, you are more susceptible to problems with your feet, so taking care of them properly is an important part of your overall healthy lifestyle. Unfortunately, calluses can show up on your feet as a diabetic and cause discomfort and unsightliness. Take a look at some of the tips to deal with calluses as a diabetic and do so in a safe manner.

Talk to your doctor about calluses that are causing problems.

Speaking with a podiatrist about calluses that are causing you concern should be your first plan of action if you have diabetes. Calluses on a diabetic’s foot can show up faster and grow large faster than on a healthy person’s foot. These out-of-place mounds of skin tissue can put undue pressure on other parts of your feet when you walk or stand. If you have a callus that is causing pain, has developed rapidly, or is otherwise worrisome, get advice from a professional.

Never try to cut a callus off of your foot on your own.

It is perfectly OK to use a gentle pumice stone or another tool to slough away dead or dry skin on your callus, but do not do anything too harsh to your foot. Many patients with diabetes develop unsightly calluses and try to cut them off, which is dangerous. Cutting away a callus can lead to an open wound on your foot that can be prone to infection and slow to heal. While doctors often cut layers of a callus off in a clinical setting, this treatment is done with great care and caution to avoid creating an open wound.

Use foot soaks to help loosen and soften callused skin on your feet.

There is nothing more gentle on your feet than a nice long soak in warm water. If you have calluses that are peeling and look bad, it is fine to do long foot soaks in warm water to soften them a bit before using a pumice stone to slough away the skin. Just make sure you stay away from harsh chemical foot peels and extremely hot water that can cause your feet more harm than good.

Calluses can be a normal thing, but when you have diabetes, these skin changes on your feet can be concerning. Talk to us at the office of Jeffery LaMour, DPM, PA for more information about treatments we offer to help with calluses.

Debunking Common Myths Associated with Ingrown Toenails

Just as painful as a toothache, ingrown toenails are one of the most common reasons for a visit to a podiatrist. This foot problem is so common, that 20 out of 100 people who visit the doctor with podiatric complaints have an ingrown toenail. As common as the issue is, there are a lot of myths out there associated with the problem.

Myth: Only people with oddly shaped toes get ingrown toenails. 

People with toes or feet of any shape can actually experience an ingrown toenail; the shape of your feet or toes doesn’t really affect your chances of having the issue. However, if you have certain toenail shapes, you may be more prone to ingrown toenail problems. For example, people who have “pincer” toenails that grow in a highly curved way can be more at risk.

Myth: You can prevent ingrown toenails by cutting the corners of your toenails. 

Cutting notches or curves at the corners of your toenails is probably not going to thwart ingrown toenail issues. In fact, it is always best if you cut your toenail straight across and don’t cut the nail too short in any area.

Myth: Ingrown toenails always have to be professionally removed.

Ingrown toenails can oftentimes be treated at home, but you do have to be careful about doing so. If the nail has just started to embed into the edge of the toe, you can usually use nail clippers, tweezers, or other small manicure tools to break the nail loose from the skin. Just make sure you are using sterile tools and don’t cause an injury to your toe in the process. Once the ingrown gets to a point where it cannot easily be pulled up and out of the surrounding skin without extreme discomfort, it is best to see a podiatrist for help.

Ingrown toenails can be super painful, and they can also lead to infections around your toes if you’re not careful. Therefore, it is best to seek professional attention if your problem seems severe. The treatment for ingrown toenails is simple and can help prevent issues with ingrown toenails for a long time. Reach out to us at the office of Jeffery LaMour, DPM, PA for help.

How to Prevent Athlete’s Foot This Summer

Summertime is here, and the livin’ is easy … unless you have athlete’s foot. Then the living is rather itchy, with some pain, dryness and scaling involved.

Because you have better things to do this summer than deal with athlete’s foot, Dr. Jeff LaMour, a top podiatrist in Austin and Pflugerville, Texas, has some recommendations to prevent you from getting athlete’s foot. Let’s start by talking about what athlete’s foot actually is.

What is athlete’s foot?

Athlete’s foot is a common fungal infection that can spread to anyone. Most people contract it from walking barefoot in a warm, moist environment like a locker room or swimming pool area. You can also get it if your feet stay sweaty (i.e. if you wear tight socks with no ventilation in your shoes).

The infection commonly results in a rash or itchy skin on the soles of your feet and between your toes. It can also cause small, red blisters, dryness, scaling, and can even cause your toenails to become discolored and pull away from the nail bed.

How can you prevent athlete’s foot?

Wash your feet often

Use soap and water. When you’ve finished washing, make sure you dry them well, especially between your toes. This will keep the fungus from finding an easy place to grow.

Wear footwear in wet public places

Whether you’re near a pool, in a gym or locker area, or in a hotel, make sure you wear sandals, flip-flops or some sort of shoes. The fungus can live on floors, so you want to avoid it as much as possible.

Keep your feet dry

Wear socks made of natural fabric or a fabric that wicks away moisture from your skin. Also, make sure your shoes fit properly and are ventilated. Wear shoes of a breathable fabric, such as canvas. You can even alternate the shoes you wear every day to ensure they’re dry when you put them on.

If your feet, socks or shoes do get wet, dry them off and change them as quickly as possible to keep the fungus from finding a home.

Don’t share

If you live with someone who has athlete’s foot, don’t share shoes, towels, linens, or socks, and don’t walk around the house barefoot.

Athlete’s foot is no picnic, but if you follow these prevention tips, your summer should be free of fungus. Stay diligent as the summer progresses, and if you need any sort of treatment for athlete’s foot, contact Dr. LaMour on the phone or through his website.

Relieve Back, Ankle, Knee and Hip Pain With Custom Orthotics

It may be surprising to learn that your foot may actually be at the root of your back, knee or hip pain. As a result, custom orthotics – so much simpler and safer than pain medications or surgery – could be the remedy you’ve been waiting for.

At Family Foot & Ankle in Austin, Texas, Dr. Jeffrey Lamour provides individualized foot and ankle care, using the latest treatment techniques and top quality custom foot orthotics. Learn about the variety of benefits you didn’t know custom orthotics can have.

Custom foot orthotics: A superior level of foot care

Custom orthotics are significantly superior to one-size-fits-all, over-the-counter options. These shoe inserts can’t relieve the variety of symptoms that custom-made orthotics can.

Made-for-your-foot orthotics address foot issues that are specific to you, using state-of-the-art technology that screens your feet for structural irregularities like high or low arches. Dr. Lamour knows that each patients’ feet are as unique as their personality. For that reason, generic foot inserts from the drugstore don’t provide the specific corrections needed to alleviate pain.

When we say pain, we don’t just mean foot pain either. Instabilities or gait problems caused by structural issues in your feet can create ankle, knee, hip and even lower back pain. Your feet have a hefty task, carrying you everywhere you go. That said, it stands to reason that starting from the ground up can help alleviate the pain you have in other parts of your body.

Custom orthotics carry plentiful benefits

Many patients who invest in custom orthotics for foot pain find additional benefits. After wearing their orthotics for a while, they often notice such perks as:

  • Diminished ankle or leg pain
  • Improved balance
  • The ability to walk farther or stand without pain for longer periods of time
  • Reduced lower back pain
  • Fewer calluses, corns, and bunions
  • Better posture

When your feet enjoy optimal support, so does the rest of your body.

A domino effect

Chronic lower back pain is one of the most common complaints among adults in this country, and among the most frequent reasons for missing work. If everyone with back pain wore custom-fitted foot orthotics, the domino effect could take place from the ground up. The reason:

If your arches are too high or too flat, or you have other structural abnormalities in your feet, it forces your feet out of alignment with your shins. If your feet and ankles turn inward or outward instead of staying in alignment with your shins, eventually, your knees also become misaligned. Once your knees shift, it can cause your thigh bones to shift and become misaligned where your thigh bones meet your pelvis.

As a result, the problem that began in your feet has affected your hips and posture, which makes your spine less stable. When your feet, legs, hips, and spine out of proper alignment, chances are you will experience lower back pain. Foot orthotics can correct this misalignment of bones beginning with your feet, creating a positive domino effect upward, until your posture improves, alleviating back pain.

Custom orthotics change the way your body moves. They also absorb impact when you walk, run, or stand. Along with alleviating back pain, this additional shock absorption may alleviate pain in your ankles, knees, and hips. And that could very well improve the quality of your life.

Your feet may not be the first area that comes to mind when you’re trying to get to the root cause of your back and joint pain, but it’s certainly worth investigating as part of the problem. To learn whether custom orthotics may be right for you, call or book a consultation online with Family Foot & Ankle.

How to Prevent Getting a Toenail Infection at the Nail Salon

With sandal season approaching, you might be thinking it’s time for a pedicure. Pedicures are relaxing, therapeutic cosmetic treatments that make your feet and toes look their best. Most pedicures include a foot soaking, scrubbing, nail clipping, massage, and nail polish.

Pedicures are relaxing, and they can make you feel good, but did you know that they can put you at risk for a toenail infection, or worse? The skin on your feet can easily be cut, increasing your risk for infection. An unsanitary nail salon can expose you to bacteria and fungus that can be hard to get rid of.

Luckily, these tips can help you can make an informed decision when you choose a nail salon for your next pedicure. Jeffery LaMour, DPM and our team regularly treat toenail fungus and other infections to help patients have healthy feet. We’ve pulled together a few tips to help you stay safe during a pedicure.

Make sure the salon is sanitary

Nail salon technicians use a variety of tools on every guest in the salon. Nail clippers, cuticle trimmers, and more should be sterilized after every use, but up to 75% of salons in the United States don’t follow state protocol for disinfecting tools. The salon should use a medical-grade sanitizing machine called an autoclave to sterilize tools. Consider bringing your own tools, including a nail file, clippers, and polish, if you’re worried about the sanitary conditions of your favorite salon.

A warm foot bath can feel great on tired feet, but the bath can transfer fungus like athlete’s foot and toenail fungus if it isn’t properly cleaned. Nail technicians should disinfect foot baths between each use. If the bath isn’t sanitized properly, you might be at risk for getting a nail fungus. Consider finding a nail salon that uses plastic liners in foot baths to avoid infection.

Watch out for cuts on your feet

It’s possible that you can suffer a small cut or injury during the process of your pedicure. Nail technicians often cut cuticles with small scissors instead of pushing them back. Cutting cuticles can expose your nail bed and increase your risk of toenail infection. If your cuticles bleed or you’ve been injured, it’s a good idea to stop the pedicure.

Some nail technicians cut or shave off corns and calluses. Just like cutting your cuticles, removing corns and calluses in this way creates a wound in your skin. Bacteria can enter through the cut, and you may develop an infection as a result. Instead of cutting or shaving, ask your nail technician to use a pumice stone to work down these areas of dead skin.

Don’t get a pedicure if you have an injury or infection

If you have a known injury or infection, your immune system might already be weakened. A cut on your foot increases your risk of contracting an infection, and you could spread the infection if the salon doesn’t properly clean their instruments.

If you have diabetes, your feet are especially prone to injury. Most people with diabetes should avoid traditional nail salons to keep their feet healthy and injury free.

To fully enjoy your pedicure, make sure your feet are injury- and fungus-free before you go. Ensure the salon follows state regulations when it comes to sanitizing all the tools they use to perform pedicures.

And be sure to go to a licensed salon — one that has been evaluated by the state health department. The salon should display their license, and your nail technician should have a certificate from the board of cosmetology. At a clean salon, your chances of having a beautiful pedicure and healthy feet is much higher.

If you think you might have a toenail infection or other foot condition, we can help you heal. Call one of our offices in Austin and Pflugerville, Texas, or use our convenient online booking tool to make an appointment with Dr. LaMour today.

What Should You Look for in a Running Shoe?

Did you know you should retire your running shoes once you’ve run 300-500 miles in them? For runners that average 10 miles per week, that’s a new pair of shoes at least once a year.

Your feet are complicated structures of bone, muscle, and connective tissue that work together to carry you to the finish line. Choosing the right running shoes for your feet is more than just picking out your favorite brand. The wrong pair of shoes can cause blisters, discomfort, and even an injury that keeps you from your runs.

When you buy new running shoes, you should look for a pair that matches your running style and supports your feet properly. Trying on the shoes before you buy and testing them by walking or running briefly is a must.

The choices in running shoes seem endless, and it can be hard to know where to start. That’s where we can help. Our podiatrist, Dr. Jeffery LaMour, regularly helps runners learn more about their feet and find the best running shoes to keep them active. Choosing the right running shoes often involves studying your running habits and examining your biomechanics to find the perfect fit.

Consider your running habits

Do you run a few miles every week or do you regularly run marathons? Your running habits and where you run play a role in your shoe selection.

If you’re training for a marathon, you’ll probably log more miles on your shoes than if you run for exercise alone. Running more means that your shoes will wear out faster. Replacing them in a timely fashion is key because running in worn-out shoes makes you more prone to injury.

Where you run influences your shoe choice, too. Hard surfaces like sidewalks and streets can be higher impact than running on trails or grass or a treadmill.

Running shoes for the road typically have softer midsoles and extra cushioning to absorb shock from solid surfaces like concrete and asphalt. Shoes for running on trails often have thicker soles to protect your feet from sharp rocks as well as thicker treads to keep you from slipping on rocks or mud.

Get your feet and gait measured

Your gait refers to the way you naturally walk and run. We can assess your gait and make recommendations to keep your feet comfortable as you run. A professional evaluation of your feet can make a big difference when you’re looking for the right running shoes. Some gait abnormalities, like overpronation or underpronation, can be corrected by the right running shoes.

Whenever you buy new shoes, you should have your feet measured to make sure you’re getting the right size shoe. Your feet change over time, and shoe manufacturers update their designs regularly, so the exact style of shoe that you bought last year might not fit the same way this year.

When you come for a shoe fitting, bring your old running shoes. Wear patterns on your used shoes will show us how your feet move as you run and help us determine if you might benefit from shoe inserts.

Once you find the right pair of running shoes, it’s a good idea to break them in slowly. Changing shoes can change your gait, and your new shoes might have more support than you’re used to. Take your new shoes out for a few short runs to let your feet get used to them before you go on a longer run.

Still, have questions about choosing a pair of running shoes? Come in to see Dr. LaMour for professional help. He’ll evaluate your feet to help you learn about the type of support you need in shoes, and make personalized recommendations just for you. Call one of our offices in Austin or Pflugerville, Texas, or request your first appointment online today to get started.

What Causes Achilles Tendonitis And How Is It Treated?

The Achilles tendons, the largest tendons in your body, join the muscles of your lower legs to the heel bone of your feet. While tendons are certainly strong, they’re not particularly flexible, which means your Achilles tendons stretch only so far before they tear or get inflamed, which is called tendonitis.

Achilles tendonitis can range from slightly uncomfortable to severely painful, and it often develops in runners and other active people.

Let’s take a look at what causes tendonitis and how to treat it.

The most common causes of Achilles tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is commonly an overuse injury. It’s usually the result of repetitive actions that lead to gradual wear and tear of your tendon, but an Achilles tendon injury can also happen suddenly.

Achilles tendonitis most often comes about with overuse. When pushed beyond their limit, the tiny fibers that make up the tendon can tear, causing pain, swelling, and inflammation. This is one tendon that has a particularly poor blood supply, making it more susceptible to overuse or wear-and-tear injuries.

Insertional Achilles tendonitis can be associated with a heel bone spur. The spur rubs against the tendon, resulting in smaller tears. Think of a rope constantly rubbing against a sharp, pointy rock.

Some of the most common causes of Achilles tendonitis include:

  • Overpronated, or very flat, feet
  • Sudden changes to your training surface, like from grass to tar
  • Doing too much training
  • Frequent hill running
  • Exercising without warming up
  • Not wearing the right supportive footwear
  • Tight calf muscles and hamstrings
  • A high foot arch
  • A traumatic injury to your Achilles tendon
  • Constantly wearing high heels or walking on your toes

As many as 10 in 100,000 people suffer from Achilles tendonitis. While recovery can be slow, it is a treatable condition.

How we treat Achilles tendonitis

Doctors can choose from a variety of treatments for Achilles tendonitis. These range from anti-inflammatory medications to platelet-rich plasma injections, and even surgery depending on the severity of your condition. Most of the time, Achilles tendonitis doesn’t require medical intervention. In cases of chronic Achilles tendonitis, it becomes necessary to seek medical attention to end your pain and suffering.

Common suggestions include:

  • Taking a break from physical activity or at least reducing how much you do
  • Gentle stretches
  • Trying a less strenuous activity

The RICE method proves particularly helpful when it comes to treating Achilles tendonitis, provided you follow the method right after you’re injured. Here’s how it works:

  • Rest: Keep the pressure off your tendon for a couple of days.
  • Ice: Hold a bag of ice against your skin for 20 minutes at a time. This can help ease swelling and inflammation.
  • Compression: Wrap athletic tape or a bandage around your tendon to compress the injury and keep swelling down.
  • Elevation: Keep your foot raised above chest level to keep the swelling down.

Another option is called extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). During treatment, Dr. LaMour uses high-energy shock waves to stimulate healing. ESWT is often used when other conservative treatment options have failed, and if it’s successful, it could save you from needing surgery.

Noticing the symptoms

Achilles tendonitis feels like a burning pain as you begin an activity. The pain lessens during your activity and then gets worse again afterward. Your tendon might feel stiff when you wake up in the morning, too.

Common Achilles tendonitis symptoms include:

  • Pain that gets worse when you use your tendon
  • Loss of strength, stiffness, and pain in the affected area
  • More stiffness and pain during the night or first thing in the morning
  • A crunching sound when you use the tendon
  • The area may feel warm and tender and appear red and swollen

If you’re suffering from Achilles tendonitis that is not getting better with home remedies, it’s time to book an appointment with Dr. LaMour, who has two offices conveniently located in Austin and Pflugerville, Texas.

A Few Things You May Not Know About Plantar Warts

Warts of any kind can be difficult to get rid of. Plantar warts are especially hard to deal with, because they are deep within the sole, or sides, of the foot. Topical and over-the-counter treatments might remove the visible, exposed portion of the wart, but the roots of the wart are left intact. The opportunity for new warts to develop remains.

Plantar warts get their name from the surface of the foot where they are most common. Because plantar warts are often located on the pressure points of the foot, they tend to grow inward, under the skin. The constant pressure of being on your feet for the better part of your day is what causes these warts to remain underneath the skin. That’s why it’s possible to have plantar warts for years and remain unaware until the warts become bothersome.

Little known facts about plantar warts

Plantar warts are common because they spread fairly easily. If you work out regularly and use the showers at your gym, you have probably been exposed to the virus that causes plantar warts.

If you’ve develop plantar warts, you usually see a depressed, circular area on the sole of your foot. This spot may be yellowish and possibly have a black spot in the middle. Beneath the flat, round area is a root with finger-like growths attached.

In addition to these basic facts, you may find that these common viral growths still hold a few surprises for you. Here are some of the lesser-known facts about plantar warts.

HPV is the cause

Plantar warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a different strain of the virus that causes cervical cancer. The HPV enters through a break in your skin, and if your antibodies don’t manage to kill the virus in time, it develops cells at a rapid rate.

The virus can be dormant

The virus can remain dormant for as long as 20 months, making it difficult to determine just where you caught the virus that led to your plantar warts. Gyms can play host to the plantar warts virus, as well as many other germs. It’s a good idea to wear shower shoes or flip-flops in public showers at your gym and in dorms. HPV likes the damp environment found in locker rooms, pool showers, and the like.

Plantar warts stick to feet

Although plantar warts like to grow and spread, they will remain on your feet. They only grow on the type of skin found on the bottom of your feet.

The warts can be painful

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. As they spread and grow, the warts can press against the nerves in your foot, causing sharp pain and burning as you walk.

They are contagious

Plantar warts are contagious, but for some reason, are much more common in youth 12-16 years old. The virus also targets those individuals with weakened immune systems.

Symptoms of plantar warts

Typically, your first symptom of plantar warts will be pain and tenderness when you apply pressure to your foot. This can feel something like a deep bruise. When you examine your foot you’ll see the telltale round spot with the black dot, as described above.

You may notice a rough, grainy lesion on the sole of your foot. The lesion will be fleshy in appearance and usually be at the front (ball) of your underfoot, on the underside of your toes, or along your heel. When you apply pressure, it will hurt.

Get rid of your plantar warts for good

Jeffery W. LaMour, DPM, PA, takes plantar warts, and all foot problems, very seriously. If your feet are causing you pain, it can affect every aspect of your daily life. Don’t endure painful, bothersome plantar warts. We can help.

Dr. LaMour specializes in a full range of services to help put an end to your foot pain, including plantar warts. Let us address your plantar warts and get rid of them once and for all. Dr. LaMour determines the best approach to remove your painful, unsightly, plantar warts. Contact one of Dr. LaMour’s two offices — in Austin and Pflugerville, Texas — today and say “so long” to your plantar warts.

Managing Pain With Orthotics

One in four adults has a foot-related problem, according to the Arthritis Foundation. And an irregularity in how you stand or walk can affect more than just your feet. A foot problem can lead to ankle, knee, hip, or even back pain if left unaddressed.

If you’ve experienced pain in your lower back, hips, knees, or ankles, you know that it can harm your quality of life. Pain can interfere with your ability to enjoy daily activities, but you don’t have to live with it.

Custom orthotics — shoe inserts created just for your feet — provide pain relief for many people and help them remain active throughout their lives. While each patient is different, Jeffery W. LaMour, DPM, PA, can help find the best treatment for you.

Kinds of pain orthotics can relieve

Custom orthotics can help you manage pain caused by a number of conditions, including:

  • Arthritis
  • Diabetes
  • Bunions and hammertoes
  • Bursitis
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Flat feet or high arches

Foot pain can make you dread activities you used to enjoy, and many of the above conditions can affect your balance or gait and cause pain in your legs and back as well. Custom orthotics can correct underlying problems with your feet, ankles, or gait, alleviating the pain that resulted from those problems.

Types of orthotics

Dr. Lamour can prescribe rigid or soft orthotics depending on your needs. Rigid orthotics are often slim, and you can wear them inside your regular shoes. Typically made of plastic, they help keep your foot properly aligned. Rigid orthotics are common for conditions like painful high arches.

Soft orthotics cushion your foot and take pressure off painful spots that can be caused by diabetes, plantar fasciitis, or other conditions. Soft orthotics can be bulkier than rigid orthotics, so you might need to wear a different type of shoe with them.

The benefits of orthotics

Orthotics adjust weight distribution on your feet and relieve pressure on sensitive points. They help your feet work correctly, reducing stress and pain caused by biomechanical issues. Orthotics are a drug-free option to help you manage chronic pain, and they’re safe to use for as long as you need them.

Store-bought shoe inserts may provide some relief for certain problems, but they aren’t customized for your feet and typically don’t last long. These over-the-counter inserts provide arch support or extra cushioning for your feet, but they don’t work to correct the problems that are causing your pain.

How custom orthotics are made to address pain

The orthotics Dr. LaMour prescribes help manage a variety of pain conditions at the source. To fit you with orthotics, Dr. LaMour first performs a thorough assessment to understand why you have pain — whether in your feet, ankles, knees, hips, or back. He watches you walk and may take images of your feet.

If he prescribes orthotics, he takes a mold of your feet that the lab uses to create high-quality customized inserts. Your orthotics are designed to correct any biomechanical abnormalities in how you walk, run, or stand.

By providing your feet the correction they need to work naturally, orthotics help relieve pressure and pain. You can expect a small adjustment period after you begin wearing orthotics, but many patients report much-needed pain relief soon after they start using them.

Orthotics are a proven option to help manage your recurring foot and lower body pain. If you want to find out how orthotics might help you, call our office or request a consultation online.

Helpful Tips For Managing Your Bunions

When you’re working or going out for the evening, it’s understandable that you want to look your best. You put on nice clothes, do your hair, and don your totally uncomfortable but great-looking shoes. You hobble the day away, smiling through the pain, and wait for the moment you finally get to remove them and massage your aching feet.

Pointy-toed, too-tight shoes are more than a daily inconvenience. Over time, these shoes can actually change the shape of your feet and lead to a condition called bunions, or hallux valgus.

These painful, unsightly bumps develop on the big toe joint when pressure is repeatedly put on it, causing the big toe to lean toward the second toe. Over an extended period of time, the structure of the bone and joint changes, which results in the dreaded bunion bump.

Although anyone can get a bunion, we see it more commonly in women due to tight, pointy, high-heeled shoes. Because specific foot shapes are more prone to bunions, we also see an increase in bunion diagnoses in people with a family history of bunions.

If you frequently wear shoes that force your toes together, we strongly recommend scheduling a consultation with Jeffery W. LaMour, DPM, PA, to determine the overall condition of your feet. Once we’ve determined that you do, in fact, have a bunion, here are the next steps.

Change Your Footwear

Once you’ve developed a bunion, the first thing you should do is contact us immediately to schedule an appointment. Dr. LaMour will likely recommend that you switch your footwear right away to something with lower heels and roomier toes. Dr. LaMour may also prescribe custom orthotic inserts to help manage your bunions and minimize pain.

Splinting

If we are able to diagnose your bunions early enough, the joint still may be flexible enough to coax back into position without surgery. One of the best ways to do this is by using a splint, typically at night, to keep the toe straight and try to realign the joint.

Splinting may not be a permanent solution, especially if the bunion has been developing for a while.

Pain Management

It’s no secret that bunions are painful, especially if you are on your feet a lot. Dr. LaMour offers recommendations to help manage the pain, which typically include exercise, ice packs, warm foot soaks, and oral or injected pain medication. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen may ease bunion pain.

Surgery

When we’re able to catch bunions early, we are usually able to save you from surgery. Unfortunately, we don’t always catch them early enough and cannot avoid surgery in every case, especially in severe or long-term cases where the joint has become arthritic. When surgery is called for, Dr. LaMour uses the latest, most advanced medical equipment and techniques to realign your joint and get you back on your feet as quickly as possible.

Bunions are no fun. They’re painful, unsightly, inconvenient, and, if untreated, can lead to arthritis. Don’t wait until it’s too late to manage your bunions without surgery. If you have a history of wearing too-tight shoes or think you may be developing a bunion, please schedule a consultation with Dr. LaMour to determine the condition of your joints. We’ll help you to manage and even reverse the bunion’s effects on your feet, body, and overall health. Get ready to once again put your best foot forward.