Did I Break My Foot? Signs You Need to See a Doctor

Have you ever broken your foot? Chances are, you may have. According to WebMD, “about 1 out of every 10 broken bones occurs in the foot.” This may seem unrealistic, but not when you consider that “25 percent of all the bones in the human body are down in your feet,” according to Foot.com. Furthermore, “when these bones are out of alignment, so is the rest of your body.” Unfortunately, many people ignore problems with their feet because they don’t consider them important, but, as Foot.com points out, your feet are the foundation of your well-being. Read on to learn about the signs of a fracture and find out when you need to see a doctor like Austin podiatrist, Dr. Jeffery LaMour.

Broken Foot Basics

As WebMD describes, “the human foot has 26 bones.” If one or more of these fractures, you have a broken foot. You may think that a break would be obvious, but this is not always the case. Of course, you may have a dramatic crack in the bone, shifting part of it to the side and making the nature of your injury clear. However, it’s also possible to develop a thin, tiny fracture, subtle enough to ignore, but unwise not to treat, as it will most likely worsen as you continue to put pressure on your feet. WebMD labels these “stress fractures…small cracks can form in bones over a longer period of time from repeated stress on the bones.”

There are many potential reasons your foot may break. WebMD reports: “bones usually break when something happens to crush, bend, twist, or stretch” them. Kicking too hard, tripping, falling, or misaligning your feet could all be the culprits of a fracture. You can minimize your risks for a broken foot by avoiding strenuous exercise, wearing appropriate footwear, and seeing your podiatrist for regular checkups.

Sprains Explained

If you’ve ever injured your foot, you may have found yourself pondering: “is it a sprain or a fracture?” These can be difficult to distinguish from each other, and they often occur at the same time. So, what exactly is a sprain? The American Podiatric Medical Association explains that unlike a broken bone, “a foot or ankle sprain is a soft tissue injury. Most often, a sprain occurs when an injury pulls, stretches, or tears the ligaments that connect bone to bone.” If you sustain enough damage to your foot to break a bone, chances are, you’ve also injured your soft tissue, as well. Sprains share many symptoms with fractures (particularly discomfort and swelling), so it can be difficult to tell them apart. However, even if your injury is “just a sprain,” it’s crucial that you see your podiatrist for treatment to heal properly.

See Your Austin Podiatrist If…

When is it time to see your doctor? We recommend coming in for a consultation if:

  • You experience discomfort when walking, running, or putting weight on your foot. However, WebMD points out: “broken bones in the toes cause less pain, and you may be able to walk with a broken toe.”
  • You notice blue, purple, or red discoloration in one or more areas of your foot. Changes in blood flow can indicate damage to the bone.
  • Your foot appears larger. Inflammation is also a symptom of fractures.
  • You notice a loss of sensation in your foot, which may manifest as a cold feeling.
  • Your foot appears visually “misshapen, deformed, or pointing in the wrong direction.”
  • You have other severe injuries to your foot, such as “a large cut or wound near a possible broken bone.”

If you believe you’ve broken a bone in your foot, we are here to help you! We can assist you with any type of fracture. We will take x-rays of your foot to ascertain if it is, indeed, broken, and recommend an appropriate treatment to help you recover.

Did You Break Your Foot?

If you believe you may have broken your foot or suffer from any of the above symptoms, we encourage you to come in to our Austin podiatry practice. Contact us today to find our more and schedule your appointment.

Original Source: https://www.drjefflamour.com/sports-injuries/did-i-break-my-foot-signs-you-need-to-see-a-doctor/

Why is the Ball of My Foot Swollen

The ball of your foot takes the brunt of your foot as you walk, run, dance, and more. This thicker portion of the foot lies between your toes and your heel, and it carries your weight as you move. The ball is already a bigger segment of your foot, but if you notice it getting larger, this could indicate a podiaic problem. Austin podiatrist, Dr. Jeffery LaMour, is available to answer all of your common foot questions so you can take better care of your feet. One query we often hear from our patients is: “why is the ball of my foot swollen?” There are many potential causes for inflammation in this area. In the following blog, we explain a few of the most common reasons for swelling and explain what you can do to address them.

Ball Basics

While we rely on the balls of our feet to carry us through life, many of us may not fully understand what podiatrists call the “metatarsal,” or the conditions that can affect it. Medical News Today explains: “Metatarsalgia, also known as stone bruise, is a type of pain and inflammation that occurs in the part of the foot known as the metatarsal (ball of foot). It often occurs in the metatarsal heads – where the three middle toes meet the ball of the foot. It is a common problem.” Your metatarsal is so vital to your foot function that swelling in the ball of your foot can significantly disrupt your daily life. In addition, the metatarsal is so versatile that there are many related conditions and activities that can affect it.

Medical News Today goes on: “A lot of physically active people suffer from [Metatarsalgia]…the severity of the pain can vary and may affect just one or two toes – sometimes the whole foot or even both feet might be affected.” Although “it is most common in middle aged females,” Medical News Today notes that “Metatarsalgia can affect males and females of all ages.” It makes sense for all of us to know more about the balls of our feet so we can prevent and treat Metatarsalgia.

The Arthritis Answer

Arthritis is a bone condition characterized by swelling and discomfort in the joints. It can affect every area of the body, including the ball of the foot, so inflammation could very well be due to arthritis. Medical News Today writes: “rheumatoid arthritis – swelled joints in the foot, or gout [arthritis caused by uric acid production] can cause Metatarsalgia.” If arthritis is the culprit, Dr. LaMour and our team offer comprehensive arthritic foot and ankle care to help you manage your condition and reduce swelling.

Nailing Your Feet with Hammertoes

Your feet are carefully calibrated systems designed to carry your weight. If one part is malformed, it can affect the rest quite easily. Therefore, a condition known as hammertoes can lead to Metatarsalgia. In this disorder, one of the middle toes is pulled downward, leading the foot as a whole to look like a hammer. Because they don’t distribute the body’s weight properly, hammertoes can stress the metatarsals and lead to swelling in the ball of the foot. In some cases, hammertoes are congenital, but they are often caused by constantly wearing unhealthy shoes that constrict the foot. If caught early enough, Dr. LaMour can help you treat hammertoes with flexible shoes, special exercises, and comforting devices such as cushions. In advanced cases, Dr. LaMour may recommend surgery.

Arch Issues

The curvature of your foot can also have a major impact on the ball of your foot. Foot Smart explains that one of the “common causes of metatarsal imbalances include[s] a high arch or flat feet, either of which places abnormal pressure across your metatarsals.” Genetic conditions, improper footwear, and a host of other factors can cause your arch to be too high or too low. To help re-balance your metatarsals, Dr. LaMour can fit you for custom orthotics, as well as prescribing other treatments as needed.

Metatarsal Management

Arthritis, hammertoes, and arch issues are some of the most likely reasons for metatarsalgia, but there are numerous potential causes for swelling in the ball of your foot. If you notice inflammation in this region, we suggest that you come in and see us for assistance. The sooner we can determine the underlying cause, the sooner we can treat it and restore your foot health.

Find Out Why the Ball of Your Foot is Swollen

Dr. LaMour and our team can help you diagnose your condition so you can find relief from inflammation. Contact us today to learn more and schedule your appointment!

Original Source: https://www.drjefflamour.com/foot-care/why-is-the-ball-of-my-foot-swollen/

My Toe is Purple!

It sounds like a bizarre nightmare: you look down and see that one of your toes has turned purple. This may seem like a strange symptom, but, actually, there are a number of reasons your toes can become discolored. If the tips of your feet have taken on a purple hue, Dr. Jeffery LaMour and our team are here to help. Our podiatry practice can assist you with a wide variety of foot-related ailments so you can enjoy excellent health. In the following blog, we explain the common reasons your toe may have turned purple and describe how we can help you return it to its natural color.

It Could be Purple Toe Syndrome

The name of this disorder speaks for itself. Reference defines it: “Purple Toe Syndrome is a medical condition characterized by the blockage of the blood vessels in the foot, which hinders the flow of blood to the tissues.” You may have noticed that other parts of your body take on a bluish purple color when they become too cold, or if you wear tight clothing, which can cut off blood circulation. The same can happen to a toe.

Reference goes on to explain: “the blockage is usually caused by the build-up of cholesterol or by a lump of plaque [a waxy substance consisting of things such as fatty acids, cholesterol, and calcium] becoming lodged in the blood vessels of the foot.”  This material can “strangle” parts of your foot, limiting blood flow, destroying cells, and causing the area to become purple “in a process known as cyanosis.” Purple Toe Syndrome is a somewhat serious disorder that “develops suddenly and rapidly and may affect many toes on a foot.” In order to treat this syndrome, you may need to have a stent inserted to facilitate circulation, or, in severe cases, Dr. LaMour may recommend surgery.

Crucial Circulation

One of the primary factors in the color of your skin is your blood flow. While Purple Toe Syndrome is more localized, Livestrong points out that “cold, purple feet signal an abnormality with the arterial circulation, the part of the circulatory system that delivers oxygenated blood from the heart to the body organs and tissues…Peripheral artery disease is the most common culprit for these symptoms.” If your feet are discolored due to PAD (Peripheral Artery Disease), they might also appear pale or white when your circulation is poor, and then become “purplish-red as blood rushes back into the foot.”

PAD can be a serious issue, especially since it can affect your whole body, but “PAD of the lower extremities is a treatable condition—and the sooner, the better.” Particularly if you suffer from diabetes or high cholesterol, come and see Dr. LaMour as soon as you notice a purple color in your feet (which may also be accompanied by a cold feeling). We will assess your feet, recommend appropriate treatment, and refer you to an appropriate specialist if needed.

Blood Blues

While Purple Toe Syndrome and PAD may be the most well known, virtually any disorder that can interfere with blood function can cause your toes to turn purple. Livestrong mentions “Buerger disease… an inflammatory condition that affects small-to-medium sized arteries…inflammation of the involved blood vessels triggers formation of clots that obstruct blood flow.” The website also notes: “Acrocyanosis is another uncommon condition characterized by abnormal regulation of blood vessels.”

Similarly, Heal Treat Cure names “poor blood circulation in your blood” and “anemia or low iron in your body” as potential reasons for purple nail beds. The connection between overall blood flow and purple toes is an excellent reminder that your feet are an important part of your holistic health care. If you notice purple toes, definitely come and see us so we can run diagnostic tests and determine the proper course of treatment.

The Flush of Fungus

A fungal infection could be the root of your purple toe, particularly if the tint is in the toenail. Nice Feet describes: “a fungal nail infection can cause discoloration of fingernails and toenails. Toenail fungus can cause the nail to appear dark.” Fungus can create a whole rainbow of toe colors, including purple, yellow, and green, to name a few. If you have a toenail fungus, Dr. LaMour can help you treat it with our advanced Pinpointe™ FootLaser™ and other excellent options.

Toe Trauma

If you’ve recently banged up your feet, your purple toe could be the result of your injury. Bruises often appear purple, and bleeding beneath the toenail can also cause a darker appearance. Dr. LaMour and our team offer a wide variety of options to assist patients with podiatric injuries.

Is Your Toe Purple?

Have you noticed a purple tint to your toe? Dr. LaMour and our team can help you figure out why your toe has changed its color and help you get the treatment you need to return your natural hue. Contact our Austin podiatry practice today to find out more and schedule your appointment!

Original Source: https://www.drjefflamour.com/foot-diseases/my-toe-is-purple/