Best Shoes for Plantar Fascitis Relief

Do you suffer from a stabbing pain in your heels? In addition to being irritating, embarrassing, and unhealthy, this sensation can make it difficult to find comfortable shoes. While high heels are some of the most common culprits, certain sneakers or even flats can hurt your feet. If you’re struggling with sore feet and can’t find the right shoes, never fear! Austin podiatrist, Dr. Jeffery LaMour, is here to help. We can help diagnose your plantar fasciitis and recommend the right shoe styles for your condition. Read on to learn more about plantar fasciitis and find the right footwear for your aching heels.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Although it has a seemingly complex name, plantar fasciitis is actually a relatively basic and unfortunately widespread disorder. As The Walking Company explains: “plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of heel pain, is inflammation of the band of tissue connecting the heel bone to the toes, supporting the arch of the foot.” This band, called the fascia, bears the brunt of the force on your feet. Mayo Clinic describes: “Under normal circumstances, your plantar fascia acts like a shock-absorbing bowstring, supporting the arch in your foot. If tension and stress on that bowstring become too great, small tears can arise in the fascia.” A wide variety of situations can put undue pressure on your fascia: excessive exercise, sitting for too long, standing for hours without rest, weight gain, arch issues, and more.

Symptoms

Many people suffer from plantar fasciitis without knowing the name of this disease. Some of the most common symptoms include:

  • A sharp, stabbing sensation in the bottom of the foot near the heel.
  • “Pain at the beginning of exercise that gets better or goes away as exercise continues but returns when exercise is completed,” reports WebMD.
  • Discomfort upon walking up stairs or “after you stand for long periods.”
  • According to WebMD, “stiffness and pain in the morning or after resting that gets better after a few steps but gets worse as the day progresses.”

If you suffer from any of the above, Dr. LaMour can help diagnose your condition and recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

Fasciitis-Friendly Footwear

Certain shoes can help ease the discomfort of your sore heels. Fasciitis-friendly footwear typically provides two key components: excellent arch support to hold your foot in the proper position, and solid shock absorption, with the strength and suppleness to take the place of your pummeled fascia.

Beat Plantar Fasciitis points out: “do realize that finding a pair of shoes that work with YOUR Plantar Fasciitis is going to be a bit of a trial and error,” since each person’s feet are different, and you’ll also need to factor in the types of activities you do and styles you prefer. Accordingly, the site breaks down fasciitis-friendly shoes into categories: running, walking, tennis, hiking, slippers, flip flops, and dress shoes. The Walking Company also offers dozens of styles of sandals, sneakers, and dressier options that are appropriate for those who suffer from plantar fasciitis. Shoe Finale also ranks the top ten shoes for women and men with plantar fasciitis, as well as categorizing them according to motion control, type, upper material, and number of color options.

How We Can Help

While the above resources are a great place to start, Dr. LaMour can also consult with you to help you find a good pair for your feet. We can also prescribe and custom-fit orthotic inserts for your shoes. While changing your footwear can work wonders, we may also recommend our minimally invasive Topaz Treatment to help your fascia heal and ease your heel pain.

Do You Suffer From Plantar Fasciitis?

Dr. LaMour and our team can help you enjoy healthier, more comfortable feet. If you suffer from plantar fasciitis or another podiatric condition, we’d be delighted to assist you. Contact our Austin podiatry practice today to find out more and schedule an appointment.

Original Source: https://www.drjefflamour.com/foot-care/best-shoes-for-plantar-fascitis-relief/

Do You Have Plantar Fasciitis’ How to Tell

With 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons, your feet are complex and amazing machines that take you places each day. And because your feet work so hard and have so many parts, a lot can go wrong.

Plantar fasciitis is one of those “little” things that can go wrong that can turn into a significant problem if left untreated. Here’s how to know if you have plantar fasciitis, and what you should do about it.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Your plantar fascia is a ligament that runs along the bottom of your foot and connects your heel to the ball of your foot and supports your arch. If it gets strained or overextended, it can get irritated and inflamed. This inflammation is known as plantar fasciitis.  Repeated strains can cause tiny tears in the ligament, which result in increased pain and inflammation. 

Know the Symptoms

The most common sign of plantar fasciitis is heel pain, especially first thing in the morning. This is because when you get out of bed, the plantar fascia may experience a sudden stretching or overextension after being in a more relaxed position at night. It can also get worse if you’ve been on your feet for a long time. Because most of these symptoms often come and go, many people think it’s not serious or simply ignore it.

What Causes It?

There is no single cause of plantar fasciitis, but the following can make you more likely to get it:

  • Wearing shoes without proper arch support. This allows the ligament to overstretch.
  • Being overweight. Excess weight may put more pressure on the plantar fascia.
  • Having tight calves and Achilles tendons. This can result from wearing high heels frequently or simply not stretching the muscles enough.
  • Having high arches or flat feet. Some people are simply born with a tendency toward plantar fasciitis due to the genetic mechanics of their foot.
  • Being a runner or spend a lot of time on your feet. This puts strain on all the ligaments in your feet, including the plantar fascia. Make sure you wear quality, supportive footwear at all times.

What You Should Do

Foot pain should never be ignored. If you think you have plantar fasciitis, it’s important to have your feet examined by a podiatrist. Leaving it untreated can lead to further pain and tearing of the ligament, heel spurs, chronic heel pain, and even leg and back pain.

The condition can often be treated with non-invasive methods such as rest, ice, stretching, and proper supportive shoes. Throw out flimsy flip flops, old worn out shoes, and shoes that hurt your feet. Some cases may need physical therapy, orthotics, or a special boot or splint you wear at night.

Plantar fasciitis is a classic example of a common foot problem that is often successfully treated when caught early. If your feet hurt, they are trying to tell you something. Contact the office of Dr. Jeffery LaMour to schedule your appointment and learn how you can keep healthy for a lifetime!

6 Pain Relief Methods for Plantar Fasciitis

The nagging pain of plantar fasciitis can not only affect your ability to perform daily activities, it can also affect your mood. Easing heel pain from plantar fasciitis may require a combination of approaches to be effective in providing the relief you’re after. Here are some of the proven, best ways to get rid of heel pain.

Rest

Take some time out of your busy schedule to literally put your feet up. Stop or reduce activities that seem to be causing your heel pain. Get rid of the heels and switch to more comfortable shoes with good arch support. Get a professional foot massage, or give yourself one at home.

Stretching exercises

Tightness of the Achilles tendons and calf muscles can contribute to heel pain by keeping the plantar fascia in a constantly tense state. Regular stretching can help lengthen and relax the plantar fascia. Try out our recommended exercises for heel pain to help loosen things up. They’re perfect for morning heel pain that can make it hard to get your day started.

Pain medications

Anti-inflammatory medications are an effective pain treatment for plantar fasciitis. Options range from over-the-counter NSAIDs, like ibuprofen, to doctor-administered cortisone injections.

Night splints

Night splints help keep the ankle in an overnight position that elongates the plantar fascia. This creates less tension in the heel, and, as a result, less pain. Several studies have shown that night splints improved heel pain in roughly 80% of people who use them. Night splints appear to be especially beneficial for those who’ve been experiencing symptoms of plantar fasciitis for longer than 12 months.

Ice packs / Ice soaks

Since cold helps reduce inflammation, ice can be effective in treating plantar fasciitis. Ice massages, ice baths, or ice packs have all been used to relieve heel pain. With an ice massage, ice is rubbed over the painful heel using a circular motion and moderate pressure for five to 10 minutes. To make an ice bath, fill a shallow pan with water and ice, submerge the heel and soak for 10 to 15 minutes. Keep the toes out of the ice water to prevent injuries from exposure to the cold. Crushed ice in a plastic bag or a bag of frozen corn or peas wrapped in a towel make for good ice packs because they can be molded to the foot and heel. It’s best to use ice therapy after exercise, stretching, or after a day’s work.

Orthotics

Over-the-counter arch supports may be useful for those with mild heel pain. Custom, full-length orthotics that provide semi-rigid arch and heel support have proven successful in treating plantar fasciitis heel pain. Heel cups decrease the impact on the heel bone, reducing plantar fascia tension by slightly elevating the heel on a soft cushion.

Are you struggling to find an effective solution for your persistent heel pain? Contact our Austin-area podiatry office for a thorough examination of your foot. We can help pinpoint the cause of your heel pain and provide you with the right options for finding relief.